In Stealth Mode

Normally when I see great blue herons fishing, they just wade right out into the water completely in the open. But when I saw this bird suddenly pop his head up out  of the reeds in the salt marsh, I suspected he may have devised a new plan. Sure enough, he decided to go into full stealth mode.

The heron tiptoed his way slowly and carefully through the reeds stalking his prey like a sneaky predator. (anyone else come to mind when reading this description?) He tried one way, then reversed direction and tried the other way. Unfortunately this method did not appear to be a huge success, I never saw him catch any fish.

But I do have to give him credit for trying a new technique. Who knows? Maybe next time it will work perfectly!

GBH in Stealth Mode

GBH in Stealth Mode

GBH in Stealth Mode

GBH in Stealth Mode

GBH in Stealth Mode

Evening’s End…

As the day winds down and night approaches, a lone alligator stands watch in the marsh as the low setting sunlight casts a purple hue on the water.

Alligator at Sunset

The Flights Were Stacked Up

Last week we had a good size crowd of wood storks coming and going all evening. They almost always arrived one at a time and they kept at it for about an hour and a half until the entire salt marsh area was warmed by setting sunlight.

Wood Stork Evening Flight

Wood Stork Evening Flight

Wood Stork Evening Flight

Wood Stork Evening Flight

Nothing Here So It’s Time To Go

This past weekend I was watching this snowy egret fishing in the salt marsh. Well… he was fishing, but he wasn’t catching.

So after a few stabs at the water he decided to try his luck elsewhere and move on to hopefully more productive fishing grounds.

Snowy Leaves the Salt Marsh

Snowy Leaves the Salt Marsh Snowy Leaves the Salt Marsh

Snowy Leaves the Salt Marsh

Done For The Day

A white ibis on a late evening flight back to his roost in the swamp.

We don’t call them “muddy ibis” by accident. This one still has marsh mud all over his face and feet!

Ibis Evening Flight

Eagle Up A Tree

Yesterday afternoon I spotted this juvenile bald eagle sitting in a pine tree along side the salt marsh. He looked to be maybe a two year bird, no signs of getting any white on his head yet.

He sat around just taking in the sights for a while when suddenly an impossibly bold mockingbird decided it might be a fun idea to dive bomb the eagle. Although the young eagle was clearly unimpressed, if the mockingbird’s strategy was to try to make the eagle leave the pine tree, it worked!

Within a few seconds the juvenile bald eagle jumped off from his branch and flew away. As he left, he flew so close by in front of me I could not fit all of him in my lens.

Juvie Bald Eagle Jumps Off From Pine Tree

Juvie Bald Eagle Jumps Off From Pine Tree

Juvie Bald Eagle Jumps Off From Pine Tree

Juvie Bald Eagle Jumps Off From Pine Tree

Juvie Bald Eagle Jumps Off From Pine Tree

Juvie Bald Eagle Jumps Off From Pine Tree

Juvie Bald Eagle Jumps Off From Pine Tree

Juvie Bald Eagle Jumps Off From Pine Tree

Juvie Bald Eagle Jumps Off From Pine Tree

These Two Only Have Eyes For Each Other

Yesterday afternoon we had 20-30 wood storks in the salt marsh feeding and flying around during low tide.

But this pair clearly stood out from the pack as they totally ignored the other storks and it became obvious they had a special connection. They were fishing together, they took time to carefully groom each other, and then they finally settled in for some quiet cuddle time.

Sometimes we say a wood stork has a face only a mother could love. Or…another wood stork.  :-)

Cuddling Wood Stork Pair

Cuddling Wood Stork Pair

Cuddling Wood Stork Pair

Cuddling Wood Stork Pair

They Are At It Again

On a recent afternoon in the salt marsh I was not at all surprised to see a pair of snowy egrets engaged in an altercation. As best as I can determine, snowys spend approx. 60% of their lives fussing and squabbling with one another. The remaining 40% will be divided among feeding, mating (I don’t know how they manage to stop fighting long enough to accomplish that), flying around and resting.

But if two snowy egrets find themselves in the same spot at the same time you can usually count on a fully fluffed up incident to occur.

It’s snowys being snowys, that’s what they do!

Snowy Egrets Argument in the Salt Marsh

Snowy Egrets Argument in the Salt Marsh

Snowy Egrets Argument in the Salt Marsh

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