“OK Boys, I’m Coming In!”

Earlier this week a wood stork made a huge production out of arriving in the marsh. Turns out though that the great blue heron was busy picking his feathers and never even noticed, and Woody’s friend seemed totally unimpressed.

Oh well, it was worth a shot I suppose.

Meanwhile, earlier in the morning, looking all the way across the marsh pond a group of egrets did not appear at all concerned about two alligators laying out on the island with them. Plus, a particularly curious tricolored heron seemed very interested in one gator’s tail.

Ok Boys Im Coming In

Looking Across the Marsh Pond

“It’s Gotta Be Here Somewhere!”

Early this morning a tricolored heron was actively fishing in the marsh when he spotted something tasty swimming around in there.

He tried extremely hard, but just couldn’t locate his slippery prey. Oh well, he’ll get ’em next time.

Tricolor Looking Around

Tricolor Looking Around

Tricolor Looking Around

Tricolor Looking Around

Some Do Better With Mornings Than Others

Early this morning a great egret was alert and hunting fish…while at the same time an alligator gliding by still looked rather sleepy.

Alligator and Egret in Early Morning

Big Breakfast…Almost

An excited anhinga came up with a nice size fish in the marsh this morning. It was a good fish. No, a great fish and will fill her up quite nicely leaving the rest of the morning available for relaxing in the sun.
But the fish was too nice. Or rather, too big. The anhinga could not flip and swallow a fish this large. She had no choice but to let it go and continue fishing for a more appropriate size morning meal. Well so it goes in nature and in life, what starts off to look like a great day turns into disappointment.
I think many of us can relate.

Anhinga Loses Big Fish

Anhinga Loses Big Fish

Anhinga Loses Big Fish

Anhinga Loses Big Fish

“You Can’t Have Any!”

Earlier this week a snowy egret plucked himself a nice shrimp out of the salt marsh during low tide.

At first the snowy was calmly eating his appetizer until a pesky ibis moved in acting all curious about what was going on. This got snowball quite excited and forced him to rush through the first course of the morning’s meal.

Snowy Eats A Shrimp in the Marsh

Snowy Eats A Shrimp in the Marsh

Snowy Eats A Shrimp in the Marsh

Snowy Eats A Shrimp in the Marsh

Turtle Nest Inventory

Earlier this week there was an inventory done on the beach of a loggerhead sea turtle nest. The inventory usually happens three days after a nest has hatched which likely took place at some point in the middle of the night. This nest was on state park beach, so park staff are involved in excavating the nest. In the first two photos you’ll notice a metal cage covering the nest. This is to prevent foxes from getting at the eggs.

They count all the cracked and broken shells to determine how many turtle babies successfully hatched. Over 100 were counted with an approx. 96% hatch rate which is a good sign.

Occasionally, one or more live turtle babies that had not yet scratched their way to the surface are discovered at the bottom of the nest and if so, they begin their journey across the sand toward the ocean.

No babies were found during this inventory and although they are exciting to see, it’s actually good news that so many made their own way out of the nest and into the sea where they will spend their lives.

It’s possible that 35 years from now, one of the females from the nest will return to this exact spot to lay her own eggs and continue the cycle.

Turtle Nest Inventory

Turtle Nest Inventory

Turtle Nest Inventory

Turtle Nest Inventory

Getting It How He Likes It

On a recent morning this white ibis caught a small crab (which they love) in the salt marsh during low tide.

After catching a crab, an ibis will typically snap off the claws first and usually eat them right away. Then the legs come off one by one until all that is left of poor crabby is a disk like hockey puck shaped structure. The remaining portion can then be wolfed down whole or broken up into small easier to manage bites.

Here the ibis skips that last part and goes right for the pièce de résistance.

Ibis Makes A Hockey Puck

Ibis Makes A Hockey Puck

Ibis Makes A Hockey Puck

Ibis Makes A Hockey Puck

Some Active…Some Not

On a recent morning over at the marsh… A great blue heron came swooping in so fast and close, I couldn’t fit all of him in my camera lens.

The little tricolored heron on the other hand. seemed perfectly happy to sit still and admire his own reflection.

Some Active Some Not

Some Active Some Not

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,396 other followers