Getting It How He Likes It

On a recent morning this white ibis caught a small crab (which they love) in the salt marsh during low tide.

After catching a crab, an ibis will typically snap off the claws first and usually eat them right away. Then the legs come off one by one until all that is left of poor crabby is a disk like hockey puck shaped structure. The remaining portion can then be wolfed down whole or broken up into small easier to manage bites.

Here the ibis skips that last part and goes right for the pièce de résistance.

Ibis Makes A Hockey Puck

Ibis Makes A Hockey Puck

Ibis Makes A Hockey Puck

Ibis Makes A Hockey Puck

Some Active…Some Not

On a recent morning over at the marsh… A great blue heron came swooping in so fast and close, I couldn’t fit all of him in my camera lens.

The little tricolored heron on the other hand. seemed perfectly happy to sit still and admire his own reflection.

Some Active Some Not

Some Active Some Not

What? No Grits?!?

As a full fledged South Carolina citizen, this egret should surely know that a traditional southern meal is shrimp and grits.

Looks like our good ole boy has passed on the grits this time though and went with the shrimp only.

In all honesty, can’t say as I blame him.:-)

Shrimp No Grits

Shrimp No Grits

Shrimp No Grits

Shrimp No Grits

Rough Breakfast

This morning a young anhinga came up out of the marsh with a decent size fish.

But by the time we saw it, the bird must have really beat up on this poor fish, as it was looking more than a little bit rough around the edges.

The anhinga did however manage to get the fish down that long skinny neck.

As is often the case in this area of the marsh, there are many types of vegetation which can get in the way of photos. But I kind of didn’t mind these because I thought they made sort of interesting and colorful geometric shapes.

Anhinga Beats Up Fish

Anhinga Beats Up Fish

Anhinga Beats Up Fish

Anhinga Beats Up Fish

“Radar” Is Back!

Well the big news over at the marsh this morning was the surprise re-appearance of our pal “Radar” who has been MIA since early Feb. 2015, almost a year and a half ago.

For those that don’t know the story… “Radar” is a great egret that was fitted with a solar powered transmitter and two antennas as part of a tracking program. When he became missing we couldn’t locate any of his original taggers and are not even sure now if anyone is still keeping any track of the boy.

We have been following him for over five years as the earliest photos of him I can find on my files are from Feb. 2011.

So where has he been for all this time?!? We heard reports that he was spotted at one point early this Spring in a nearby rookery so if that’s the case then he found himself a girlfriend.

But that never previously stopped him from returning to the marsh where he was always Head Egret In Charge. “Radar” even stood up to the alligators and even they seemed to recognize and respect his authority.

So we hope he sticks around for a while, but he is going to have some work to do getting all the other birds in line now that the sheriff is back in town! :-)

Radar Is Back

Radar Is Back

Radar Is Back

How Rude!

What? You thought I meant the egret unceremoniously gulping a fish this morning in the marsh?!?

No, I’m talking about the weeds that unexpectedly jumped out at me creating an unsightly green blob in the bottom ride side of my picture.

The fish? Well, we all know how that goes…

How Rude

Standoff

An alligator was sneaking around in the marsh yesterday morning trying to intimidate a little snowy egret as a wood stork solemnly stood watch.

Soon the wood stork had some friends arrive, but so did the alligator. It all eventually ended as a stalemate once the alligators slunk off and the wood storks went back about their usual business of fishing and fussing with each other.

Sneaky Alligator Gets Help

Sneaky Alligator Gets Help

 

Summer Arrivals

Well the wood storks have finally been showing up at the marsh in the past couple of weeks. They seem to arrive in small groups or even sometimes as singles.

This past weekend we had an early morning meeting which quickly broke up as they flew off and went about their business for the day.

Wood Storks Begin Arriving

Wood Storks Begin Arriving

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